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Tag: kubernetes

Reducing Java JVM memory usage in Containers and on Kubernetes

For a while I have been running a Wikibase query service update script for WBStack, which is a Java application on a Kubernetes cluster. Part of that journey has included the updater using all available memory, hitting into the kubernetes memory limit and being OOM killed. The title of the post is a little verbose, but I wanted to include all of the keywords that might help people find the answers to the memory issues that I was running into.

Before getting into my weeds, if you want the answers head straight to https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2017/04/04/openjdk-and-containers/

UPDATE: This blog post was written with Java 8. Java 10+ now automatically recognizes memory limits and enforces them. https://www.docker.com/blog/improved-docker-container-integration-with-java-10/

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WBStack Infrastructure

WBStack currently runs on a Google Cloud Kubernetes cluster made up of 2 virtual machines, one e2-medium and one e2-standard-2. This adds up to a current total of 4 vCPUs and 12GB of memory. No Google specific services make up any part of the core platform at this stage meaning WBStack can run wherever there is a Kubernetes cluster with little to no modification.

A simplified overview of the internals can be seen in the diagram below where blue represents the Google provided services, with green representing everything running within the kubernetes cluster.

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From 0 to Kubernetes cluster with Ingress on custom VMs

While working on a new Mediawiki project, and trying to setup a Kubernetes cluster on Wikimedia Cloud VPS to run it on, I hit a couple of snags. These were mainly to do with ingress into the cluster through a single static IP address and some sort of load balancer, which is usually provided by your cloud provider. I faffed around with various NodePort things, custom load balancer setups and ingress configurations before finally getting to a solution that worked for me using ingress and a traefik load balancer.

Below you’ll find my walk through, which works on Wikimedia Cloud VPS. Cloud VPS is an openstack powered public cloud solution. The walkthrough should also work for any other VPS host or a bare metal setup with few or no alterations.

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